Shakespeare on the page in Romania: before and after 1989

Source document: Theatralia. 2021, vol. 24, iss. Special Issue, pp. 33-46
Extent
33-46
  • ISSN
    1803-845X (print)
    2336-4548 (online)
Type: Article
Language
English
Abstract(s)
This article aims to identify the evolution of Shakespeare's reception in Romania – not as a powerful icon of world drama, i.e., not from the viewpoint of performance criticism, but as the subject of reference books written in Romania in the Communist and the post-Communist age, respectively. The history of Shakespeare monographs and collective volumes produced in the interval examined here has three distinct phases: (1) the first, spanning from 1945 to 1965, reveals the strong influence of Russian Bolshevik ideology; (2) in the second phase, overlapping Nicolae Ceauşescu's national-Communist dictatorship, Shakespearean criticism, paradoxically, appears to be freed from the impositions of Communist ideology; (3) the postCommunist decades witness the emergence of at least two generations of Shakespeare scholars who write mostly in English, either for a foreign readership (participating in the newly developed cultural exchanges of the 'global village') or for Romanian readers that are speakers of English – hence, a gap appears between the works of local Shakespeare scholars and the national culture.
Document
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