Social identity and its reflection in communication : Jimmie Blacksmith in Thomas Keneally's novel The chant of Jimmie Blacksmith

Source document: Brno studies in English. 1995, vol. 21, iss. 1, pp. [67]-76
Extent
[67]-76
  • ISSN
    1211-1791
Type: Article
Language
English
License: Not specified license
Document
References:
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[2] ALLWOOD, J. (1990): On the role of cultural content and cultural context in language instruction. [Goteburg Papers in Theoretical Linguistics]

[3] CRYSTAL, D. and DAVY, D. (1969): Investigating English Style. [Longman]

[4] HOLMES, J. (1992): An Introduction to Sociolinguistics. [Longman]

[5] HUDSON, R. A. (1991): Sociolinguistics. [CUP]

[6] LEECH, G. N. & Short, M. (1994): Style in Fiction. [Longman]

[7] McCRUM, R., CRAN, W., MACNEII. (1986): The Story of English. [Elizabeth Sifton Books]

[8] QUIRK, R., GREENBAUM, S. (1973): A University Grammar of English. [Longman]

[9] RICKARD, J. (1990): Australia. A Cultural History. [Longman]

[10] The Macquire Dictionary of Australian Colloquallisms. (1984) [Macquarie Library Pty. ]

[11] WARD, R. (1992): Concise History of Australia. [UQP]

[12] WIEDER, L . D., PRATT, S. (1990). On Being a Recognizable Indian Among Indians. In DONAL CARBAUGH. (Ed.) Cultural Communiaction and Intercultural Contact. [Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Hillsdale]