Sam and Me, Masala and Double happiness : multicultural experience in Canadian film of the early 1990s

Source document: Brno studies in English. 2008, vol. 33, iss. 1, pp. [185]-198
Extent
[185]-198
  • ISSN
    1211-1791
Type: Article
Language
English
License: Not specified license
Abstract(s)
The article examines the representation of multicultural experience in Canadian film of the early 1990s. Using three case studies of feature films made by Asian-Canadian filmmakers - Sam and Me (Deepa Mehta, 1991), Masala (Shrinivas Krishna, 1991), and Double Happiness (Mina Shum, 1994) - the text focuses on how up and coming minority filmmakers cinematically addressed various aspects of diasporic identity and identity formation.
Document
References:
[1] Banning, Kass (1999) 'Playing in the Light, Canadianizing Race and Nation'. In Armatage, Kay; Banning, Kass; Longfellow, Brenda; Marchessault, Janine (eds) Gendering the Nation, Canadian Women's Cinema. Toronto, Buffalo, London: University of Toronto Press.

[2] Gittings, C. E. (2001) Canadian National Cinema, Ideology, Difference and Representation. New York and London: Routledge.

[3] Krishna, Shrinivas (1991) Masala. Unpublished production notes. Toronto.

[4] Krishna, Shrinivas (1991) Masala. Unpublished script. Toronto.

[5] Levitin, J. (2002) 'Deepa Mehta as Transnational Filmmakers, or You Can't Go Home Again'. In Beard, William and White, Jerry (eds) North of Everything – English-Canadian Cinema Since 1980. Edmonton, Alberta: University of Alberta Press.

[6] Shum, M. (1994) Double Happiness. Unpublished production notes. Toronto.

[7] Waltz, Eugene P. (2002) 'Introduction: What Is Canadian Cinema?'. In Waltz, Eugene P. (ed.) Canada's Best Features: Critical Essays on 15 Canadian Films. Amsterdam and New York: Rodopi.

[8] Waugh, T. (2002) 'Home is not the place one has left or Masala as 'a multicultural culinary treat'?'. In Waltz, Eugene P. (ed.) Canada's Best Features: Critical Essays on 15 Canadian Films. Amsterdam and New York: Rodopi.